Tips

  •  Determine your meeting place(s), route and schedule.
  • Successful vanpools typically use no more than four pickup points.
  • Put it in writing. Here is a sample Vanpool Policy statement.
  • Be on time.
  • Decide how long the driver must wait.
  • Don’t disturb neighbors by honking your horn if a rider is running late.
  • Vanpool drivers must behave responsibly and be dependable.
  • Organizational and communication skills come in handy for working with a group of individuals. Make certain you have a substitute driver, maps, schedules, vehicle maintenance schedule, insurance, employers, and financial arrangements.
  • Communicate: Have a Vanpool Participant Contact List, give advance notice of days you won’t vanpool, speak up if something is not working out.
  • Vehicles for vanpooling must be maintained for road safety, reliability, and cleanliness.
  • Drive carefully: Speeding, unsafe lane changes, and drinking alcohol should not be tolerated.
  • Vanpool for commute purposes only.
  • Respect each other’s time and run errands after your commute.
  • Enlist help from your employer. They can add to the success of your program by offering Commuter Choice tax benefits, an Emergency Ride Home program, and by committing to considering vanpool participation when making schedule changes.
  • Have a backup driver and/or ride to and from work to cover absences for vacations, illness, family emergencies, overtime, car repairs and so on.
  • Be realistic; be honest. If you have demands on your time (flexibility, overtime, personal life, entertainment), then perhaps your commute needs would be better met with a rideshare alternative like telecommuting, flexible schedule, public transit, cycling, or carpooling anywhere from once to a few times each week.